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High School of Business News

Future-Minded: Always Listening, Always Researching


Over the last two months, it has been our pleasure to work with the exemplary group of educators and education administrators who formed the High School of Business™ National Task Force. The group advised us on program improvements and ideas for reaching more students. Thank you for sharing your time and expertise for the benefit of students! 

Full list of HSB National Task Force members:

Name Position School/Employer State

Anderson, Dana  

State Program Leader  

CO Community College System  

CO  

Anderson, Molly  

State Program Leader  

CA Dept of Ed  

CA  

Atha, Holly  

President/CEO  

MBA Research  

OH  

Berkey, Lisa  

Director, HSB  

MBA Research  

OH  

Brophy, Janet  

HSB Teacher  

Haxtun High   

CO  

Burrow, Ken  

HSB Teacher  

Waverly-Shell Rock High  

IA  

Compton, Kelli  

Asst. Principal, former HSB Teacher  

West CTA  

NV  

Stefan, Kyla  

Career/College Coord.  

Oconomowoc  

WI  

Mangini, Rick  

Exec VP  

MBA Research  

OH  

McIntosh, Joelle  

HSB Teacher  

Ritenour High  

MO  

Neal, Angie  

Administrator of CTE  

West Ada Schools  

ID  

Urich, Laurie  

Manager, HSB  

MBA Research  

AZ  

Williams, Shauna  

State Program Leader  

Idaho CTE  

ID  


Digital Portfolios Help Students Prove Readiness for College, Career


For several years, Hilary Wimmer of Mountain Range High School (CO) has had students complete portfolios as part of her High School of Business™ (HSB) program. The value of this is often confirmed by alumni who tell her that they used the portfolio during their jobs search, college application process, and scholarship application process. In each HSB course, students complete a piece of the portfolio (e.g., they create a résumé during the 10th grade Principles of Business course and a final portfolio submission in their 12th grade Business Strategies course).  

Also included in the portfolio is an “Examples” section where final project deliverables, such as a business plan, are uploaded. Wimmer encourages students to upload projects from other courses as well, such as writing assignments from ELA courses. Senior year, students update their résumé and submit their completed multi-page portfolio, which counts as a grade in the HSB Business Strategies course. HSB teachers, find complete instructions for integrating a portfolio into your HSB program on the “Principles of Business” page of the HSB Wiki.

Wimmer recommends Google Sites for portfolios, but there are many web services that could be used. In a recent article in Techniques Magazine, a culinary teacher recommended CTEfolio digital portfolios. Find out what works best for your students and help them prove they are ready for college and career!


Star Students: Recognizing Hard Work, Spreading Happiness

 

Teaching and learning in a pandemic is difficult. We love this idea shared to us by Kory Zulauf, a High School of Business teacher at Greeley West High School, on how we can recognize each other's hard work during a time when spreading happiness is much needed. Kory describes her idea below:

"I can't speak for anyone else, but the transition to solely virtual, then hybrid, then solely virtual, and back to hybrid has been super rough on our students (and us as teachers).

I found myself grasping for out-of-the-box engagement strategies just to keep kids going, as well as myself. Rich and I had talked about doing something like this for a while, but this year was the year to go out on a limb and make it happen. We ordered a ton of red party stars, ribbon, and push pins. We now have 'HSB Star Students' hanging from our ceiling.

They can get their name on a star by doing something that we as teachers recognize, but that wasn't enough. We have a Google form in our course shells where students have the opportunity to give shout-outs to each other for things that we can't regularly see happening in their groups. The day I added the Google form and told them what was happening, students immediately went in to recognize a teammate! The amazing things that they are saying about each other has put a lump in my throat for the entire day. The nominations just keep pouring in. It's clear that students are needing to spread happiness just as much as we do...and I'm brought to tears almost every time that I walk in. They have vowed that my ceiling will be covered in red stars."


Tips for Virtual Field Trips

Field trips make for memorable learning experiences. However, with the ongoing pandemic, the days of traditional field trips are on hold. Bring those memorable learning experiences to your students with virtual field trips! High School of Business™ teachers from Eastern High (KY), Maria Machin and Rachel Frydlewicz, shared their tips with us on how to organize a successful virtual field trip. Maria’s students went on a virtual field trip to Salsarita’s, a locally owned restaurant chain in Louisville, KY, while Rachel’s students virtually visited the Kentucky Derby Museum.

Tip 1: Use your existing business contacts.

Maria Machin: “Pam Stallings is the marketing director of Salsarita's which is a fast-casual, locally owned restaurant chain in Louisville. Earlier in November, Pam reached out to us at our advisory (steering committee) meeting to find more Eastern students ready for work-based learning, so I reached out to her with my idea [of a virtual field trip].” 

Rachel Frydlewicz: “The process in carrying out the virtual field trip [to the Kentucky Derby Museum] was just a matter of sending an email to the director. It helped that we went on in-person field trips in years past. So, we had already built rapport.”

Tip 2: Work with your business contact to tie the field trip to classroom lessons.

MM: “I did an employability project [that] incorporated workplace communication, ethical leadership, leadership, and employment law... Ms. Stallings gave us a virtual tour of one of her restaurants where kids got to see lunch and catering prep, hear from the workers there, and Ms. Stallings gave tips on ‘dos and don'ts’ of applying for a job. We did an exercise where we looked at a bad application and talked about what was wrong with it.” 

RF: “The presentation was a combination of both our heads together. I wanted to link the supply and demand concepts [from our current lesson] to a real-world scenario. The presenter and his co-host engaged the students in the chat; they also called on random students to not only answer questions, but to also use them in examples. They both took us on a virtual tour first. Then, they went over the impact of the Derby on the city of Louisville, discussing marginal utility—how to determine the price of a ticket based on the demand, and supply and demand, such as seat costs on a normal day vs. Derby day and personal seating licenses. The main presenter also spoke about African Americans because this is a pillar in our district.”

Tip 3: Use the technology that works best for you, your business contact, and your students. 

MM: “I didn't have any logistical issues because I used the Google Meet link that the students always use to log in [for virtual class]. I just shared that link with Ms. Stallings and she joined us—just had to get her there vs. all my students. I shared the presentation from my screen, and she shared from her phone as she walked around the restaurant as an audience member. I am doing each class separately at their regular Google Meet time, so that made it seamless.” 

RF: “The most challenging hurdle to jump was the student access to the Google Meet. The Kentucky Derby presenter hosted [using their own link], and our students could not access with their credentials. To pivot, students had to use personal accounts. I'll also mention that all three classes were invited to one time-slot. I consider it a success because I had 45/75 students attend. Upon reflecting, I would have created an event in my MS Teams calendar. Then, I would have given the presenter access to share on that platform.”

Students in Maria Machin’s class take a live tour of local restaurant Salsarita's
and talk to the restaurant’s marketing director, Pam Stallings, during a virtual field trip.

TV Coverage: The Business of Germs

Brands like Lysol and Purell have seen sales explode because of COVID-19. High School of Business™ students at GlenOak High (OH) have also found a way to solve a consumer problem. Their new product, Shopping Shield, is a reusable cover for shopping cart handles. Students said they wanted to create something useful in response to the pandemic and eliminate waste created by single-use disinfectant wipes. Entrepreneurship is part of the HSB program at the school, which supplements their course using Junior Achievement resources. See TV coverage on News 5 Cleveland


Integrating Candid Career Into Your Course and School

How can Candid Career be integrated into High School of Business™ courses? Maria Machin at Eastern High (KY) integrated use of Candid Career into Principles of Business project #4, Business to the Rescue. Her students used Candid Career to find examples of professions in each of the functional areas of business, write about them, and connect them to their own career goals. Thanks to Maria for allowing us to share this example of student work.

You can also share access to Candid Career with your entire school, and now is the perfect time see what it has to offer! With over 8,000 videos available, all students (not just HSB students!) can access a robust variety of interviews with professionals to explore their career interests.

A reminder that business career exploration through Candid Career also serves as an alternative to the HSB observational internship requirement during the pandemic. Some of the roles your finance students can learn about include accountant, investment advisor, and wealth advisor. Marketing students can learn about the roles of an account manager, marketing research executive, chief marketing officer, and more. 


Star Student in Superintendent’s Report

We love to see how Columbus Grove High School (OH) recognized High School of Business™ student Jevin Langhals in its latest Superintendent's Report. Jevin was recognized for his accomplishments as one of the top scorers nationwide on the HSB final exams for the 2019-2020 school year. Celebrating your students' accomplishments in reports like this are a great way to gain recognition among your entire school district and community. 


HSB Students Gain Lifelong Skills

“We’ve learned about everything from globalization and respecting cultures to how the stock market works. And I’m only halfway through the program. I feel prepared to take on so many different situations in business because of the in-depth units taught in this program.”

In this news article, High School of Business™ students at Longmont High School (CO) share how lessons in HSB have not only introduced them to business practices, but also allowed them to network and build a strong in-school community. Many students have taken the lessons they’ve learned in HSB and applied them by creating personal businesses online and in the community.


Key Takeaways from Annual HSB Survey

Every year in the spring semester, HSB school steering teams participate in a thorough evaluation of their programs. When we receive the results of these surveys, our staff reviews them in aggregate. This data enables us to measure the impact of the program, identify areas for improvement, and share best practices. Below are some of the key findings.

Key Data Points

  • 13: Average number of college credits HSB students have the opportunity to earn at a participating school.
  • 50% of participating schools have local agreements with 2-year colleges
  • 38% of participating schools have local agreements with 4-year universities
  • 7 national credit agreements are available to all HSB completers
  • 25% of schools recognize HSB courses with honors or weighted grading
  • 97% of HSB completers met their state’s requirements for ELA and Math
  • 95% of HSB alumni believe participation in HSB will increase their ability to succeed in a career—94% of HSB alumni believe participation in HSB will increase their ability to succeed in a college

Special Support for 2020-21

Arranging for work-based learning opportunities is difficult if not impossible this year. An observational internship is an important piece of High School of Business. This year, we are pleased to provide all HSB schools with an account for CandidCareer.com. Using it will expose students to careers and help them with career planning. Candid Career has interviewed thousands of professionals nationwide in order to bring their first-hand knowledge about their career and advice directly to students through video.


Top Scoring Schools Recognized for 2019-2020

Congratulations to the following schools that had students scoring in the top 10% on final exams across the country. Each has been sent a list of students and a press release to garner local recognition.

Due to COVID-19 and final exams being waived at the end of the 2019-20 school year, we are only able to report this data for Leadership, Principles of Business, Principles of Marketing, and Principles of Management. 

Leadership - Schools With at Least One Student in Top 10% 

Academy of Arts, Careers & Technology

Arvin Education Center

Caldwell High School

Camdenton High School

Eastern High School

Ft. Lupton High School

Greeley West High School

Kuna High School

Longmont High School

Mountain View High School

Nevada Regional Tech Center

Peetz School

Prairie View High School

Ritenour High School

University High School

Waverly-Shell Rock High School

West CTC

 

Principles of Business - Schools With at Least One Student in Top 10% 

Academy of Arts, Careers & Technology

Advanced Technologies

Beloit Memorial High School

Benedictine High School

Benton High School

Camdenton High School

Central High School (MO)

Columbus Grove High School

Eastern High School

El Segundo High School

Fremont High School

Ft. Lupton High School

George Washington High School

GlenOak High School

Grand Junction High School

Greeley West High School

Green Valley High School

Haxtun High School

Holyoke High School

John F. Kennedy High School

Kuna High School

Legacy High School

Longmont High School

Mariemont High School/Great Oaks

Middleton High School

Mountain Range High School

Mountain View High School

Nevada Regional Tech Center

Oconomowoc High School

Payette River Technical Academy

Platte Valley High School

Plattsmouth High School

Prairie View High School

Princeton High School/Great Oaks

Riverdale Ridge High School

Rock Canyon High School

University High School

West Bend East and West High School

West CTC

Wray High School

 

Principles of Marketing - Schools With at Least One Student in Top 10% 

Academy of Arts, Careers & Technology

Advanced Technologies

Benton High School

Central High School (MO)

Eastern High School

Grand Junction High School

Green Valley High School

John F. Kennedy High School

Kuna High School

Longmont High School

Mariemont High School/Great Oaks

Middleton High School

Mountain Range High School

Mountain View High School

Nevada Regional Tech Center

Oconomowoc High School

Prairie View High School

Rock Canyon High School

Waverly-Shell Rock High School

West Bend East and West High School

West CTC

 

Principles of Management - Schools With at Least One Student in Top 10% 

Austintown Fitch High School

Camdenton High School

Eastern High School

GlenOak High School

Grand Junction High School

Greeley West High School

Green Valley High School

Haxtun High School

John F. Kennedy High School

Kuna High School

Longmont High School

Monarch High School

Mountain Range High School

Oconomowoc High School

Plattsmouth High School

Rock Canyon High School

Washington Senior High School/Great Oaks

West Bend East and West High School

West CTC

 
Below we share a few key findings that these schools have in place.

Experience: Most of these schools have been participating in the HSB program for several years. We know as teachers gain experience teaching the courses, they see the results reflected in their students’ learning outcomes.
Collaboration and professional development: Many of these schools work together as a team in some way to gain insight from one another. In Colorado they have statewide HSB professional development twice per school year. In the Great Oaks system in Cincinnati, they have dedicated HSB professional development days. Schools in Nevada, particularly Clark County District schools, work together and welcome collaboration with other NV districts.
Test preparation: Several of the high-scoring schools reported that they weave test preparation throughout their courses. We asked teachers to document how they do this. Their ideas are now posted on the ‘Online Exams’ page of the HSB Teacher’s Wiki.

In the chart below, we have listed the highest scores, the average high scores, and the national averages, by course. Congratulations to your teachers, students, and steering team members. Thank you for all that you do to continuously improve the program at your school!


Project-Based Learning in a Pandemic?

During a recent High School of Business™ Teacher Advisory Committee meeting, teachers shared that there are a few silver linings to the nonstop changes the pandemic has caused. They say they can tell that use of real-world projects in the classroom has resulted in students becoming more comfortable with adapting and reacting to change. Simply stated, project-based learning teaches students to be nimble, resilient, and persistent.  

In a classroom setting, teaching students about the external factors that impact business (such as governmental changes, disasters, pandemics, or simply a competitor opening across the street) can be difficult to teach. As future business leaders, this generation of students will better understand the importance of mitigating business risk through such tactics as having a cash reserve and writing a risk management plan. In the 16 years of continuously building and improving the HSB program, we have never once considered moving away from project-based learning as the heart of the program. We are even more certain about that now.  

Find terrific resources for using PBL in your classroom at PBLWorks.org and Edutopia.org. And we invite you to consider adopting the High School of Business program.  


Get Social: Look Inside a High School of Business™ Class

What does a High School of Business™ class look like during remote learning? Thanks to Rachel Frydlewicz and Maria Machin, teachers at Eastern High School (KY), you can see just that on Twitter. In their daily tweets, Rachel and Maria share the techniques they use to communicate with students virtually as well as how they've adjusted and enhanced different HSB projects for distance learning. Follow us on social media so you don't miss out on posts like these! 


More College Opportunities for Students

Earlier this year, MBA Research welcomed Graceland University as a High School of Business™ affiliated college. Graceland University now offers 12 college credits and a generous scholarship to students who complete the High School of Business™ program. The Iowa-based university joins Bowling Green State University (OH), Bellevue University (NE), Davenport University (MI), University of Northern Colorado, Metro State University of Denver, and Valley City State University (ND) in offering articulated national credit options to HSB students. In addition, most participating schools have agreements for credit with their local college partners. It makes sense—HSB curriculum is accelerated, so students master learning outcomes that reach into the post-secondary level. View all credit options.


Recognize Your HSB Top Scorers

We recently released a list of schools with students who scored in the top 10% on HSB final exams during the 2019-20 school year. Each of these schools received a list of students and a press release to garner local recognition. We encourage you to notify your local media outlets of your students' accomplishments, such as this news article recognizing Fremont High top scorers. 


Service Project Gains Local Recognition

Well done to Alaina Brown, a High School of Business™ student at Leipsic High School (OH), for leading her classmates in a recycling project at her school. This environmental service project earned local media attention in the Putnam County Sentinel newspaper.

At school, Alaina was recognized as the HSB/FBLA "Flexer of the Month" for November. Yvette Schroeder, HSB teacher at Leipsic HS, says back in September, Alaina asked if she could organize a recycling project for all the empty water bottles that were being thrown away. The school district received a very large donation of water bottles and she was watching many of the empty bottles end up in the trash can. After watching Alaina take ownership of the project, Yvette thought Alaina needed to be recognized for her efforts.

"At the same time, I was reading about teenage brain development and learned that adolescents' brains are more capable of change than children or adults, giving them greater ability to actually shape—or flex—their brain’s development," said Yvette. "With this concept, the 'Flexer of the Month' was developed to challenge the students to think outside of the box and flex their brain to accomplish something far greater than what they imagined was possible."


Remote-learning feature: Project-based learning and teamwork can happen online

Last week, we hosted High School of Business™  Summer Training Institute. As with many other events at the moment, the decision to meet online was made of necessity. We were particularly wary because the primary pedagogy used in the program is project-based learning. And, we are firm believers that teachers benefit from experiencing PBL as modeled by trainers before they begin to teach it.

Many hours went into designing the training. It was a success from the viewpoints of the participants and our staff. We hope these lessons learned encourage you to not abandon PBL should you need to teach it remotely.

  1. Start with a Tech Dry Run. Help students learn technology (and test it yourself!) in a low-stakes session. Use fun ice breaker activities to teach basic functions, such as chat box, response icons, mute/unmute buttons, playing a video, sharing the screen, and adjusting webcam settings.
  2. Use break-out rooms for teamwork. Group assignments can be manual or random. A timer brings everyone back into the main session automatically. In-class facilitation can be mimicked by easily visiting break-out rooms. We found that while discussion within the large sessions was not as active as in live training, the participants felt more comfortable talking in the break-out rooms.
  3. Guest speakers, as always, are essential. And, they are possibly easier to coordinate virtually than in-person visits. No time spent traveling to/from the school. No parking/building pass. It may be even easier for guest speakers to participate in your class online than in person. And now that most people have had to become familiar with online meetings, the comfort level for doing this is higher.
  4. Assign recorded video reflections. These were more thoughtful than the written reflections we have seen at in-person training sessions. We are not sure why this is, but there was definitely a difference.
  5. Make extra efforts to build community. It will likely take a little more work online than in person. Students typically get to know each other organically as they sit side by side in the classroom. Build in some fun “ice breaker-style” activities that encourage getting to know one another. We also recommend asking students to leave webcams on to increase participation.
     

New! College credit, scholarships for High School of Business students

MBA Research is pleased to announce that Graceland University now offers 12 college credits and a generous scholarship to students who complete the High School of Business™ program. The Iowa-based university joins Bowling Green State University (OH), Bellevue University (NE), Davenport University (MI), University of Northern Colorado, Metro State U. of Denver, and Valley City State U (ND), in offering articulated national credit options to HSB students. In addition, most participating schools have agreements for credit with their local college partners. Makes sense – HSB curriculum is accelerated, so students master learning outcomes that reach into the post-secondary level. 


Students at Waverly-Shell Rock High design and execute
market research to inform their promotional campaign.

High School of Businesss Students Build Financial Literacy Website

Student "voice and choice" in project-based learning allows students to decide how best to answer a project's driving question. At Waverly-Shell Rock High in Iowa, members of the school's High School of Business program created this website to teach high school and college students personal finance skills. The class worked together to film, build, and promote the site, which was also submitted as a DECA project. With all content organized into projects, students like these are doing business every day.

Project Inspires Economic Development Ideas Throughout a Small Community

This Facebook post inspired a 59-comment conversation, flooded with ideas for new businesses. In honor of #CTEMonth, hats off to teachers like Ms. Schroeder who give their best every day to their students and community. Read the post below:

“How could a vacant building/lot be put to best use? This is the driving question my 9th grade business economics students will try to answer in a project called, Make the Most of It. Back in 2009, a group of students walked through the 1st and 2nd floors of 200 E. Main Street and brainstormed ideas for a business that would benefit the Leipsic community. Their idea was to build a coffee shop on the 1st floor and a teen center on the 2nd floor. Little did they know that within 9 years, both types of businesses would be successful additions our little town.

Today, I have a new group of 9th graders who will be answering the same question and they'd like the input of the "older people in Leipsic." The vacant buildings/lots they are working with are pictured here. By the end of the week they will have decided which space will be the focus of their project. The ideas you all come up with in this post will be added to the ones the students generate from interviews they conduct on their own. Here is the question they'd like you, the older people, to answer:

What type of business do you think would benefit the community?”

Source: Facebook post of Yvette Schroeder, High School of Business™ teacher, Leipsic High, OH

"Why I'm in HSB"

As all teachers know, your current students are your best cheerleaders. This testimonial video from Mountain Range High in Colorado is used encourage incoming students to sign up for HSB courses. At just one minute in length, it carries a powerful message from a diverse group of poised, professional students.

Top Scoring Students Recognized for 2018-2019

During our recent Fall Training Institute in Louisville, KY, HSB Director, Lisa Berkey, announced the students who scored in the top 10% on final exams at schools across the country. In prior years we’ve spoken with teachers and administrators at schools where students are achieving high scores. Below we share a few key findings that these schools have in place.

Experience: Most of these schools have been participating in the HSB program for several years. We know as teachers gain experience teaching the courses, they see the results reflected in their students’ learning outcomes.

Collaboration and professional development: Many of these schools work together as a team in some way to gain insight from one another. In Colorado they have statewide HSB professional development twice per school year. In the Great Oaks system in Cincinnati, they have dedicated HSB professional development days. Schools in Nevada, particularly Clark County District schools, work together and welcome collaboration with other NV districts.

Test preparation: Several of the high-scoring schools reported that they weave test preparation throughout their courses. We asked teachers to document how they do this. Their ideas are now posted on the ‘Online Exams’ page of the HSB Teacher’s Wiki.

You can view the schools with high-scoring students by clicking on the individual course links below. Because of tied scores, you will find that there are more than 10% of the total number of exams taken for each course, in the “top 10%”. In the chart below, we have listed the highest scores, the average high scores, and the national averages, by course. Congratulations to your teachers, students, and steering team members. Thank you for all that you do to continuously improve the program at your school!

 

9.5 college credits for High School of Business students

The annual state-of-the-program letter recently sent to all schools participating in High School of Business included the latest program data. Congratulations to all students who have benefited from success completion of this rigorous program!

  • 9.5: Average number of college credits HSB students have the opportunity to earn at a participating school
  • 3-30: Range of credits available to HSB students at participating schools
  • 58% of participating schools have local agreements with 2-year colleges.
  • 18% of participating schools have local agreements with 4-year universities.
  • 6 national credit agreements are available to all HSB completers.
  • 32% of schools recognize HSB courses with honors or weighted grading.
  • 97% of HSB completers met their state’s requirements for ELA and math.
  • 93% of HSB completers met their state’s requirements in technical skills.

Varsity letter, honor cords for HSB graduates

Students at Prairie View High (CO) earn a varsity letter and business pin for successful completion of the first year of HSB. During the next three years they can add gold bars. At graduation, students wear red and black honor cords in recognition of successful completion of the program. These benefits and many others have resulted in large leaps in enrollment. Kudos to HSB Teacher Jean Schneider and her team at PVHS for their dedication to preparing students for the future. 

  

International Baccalaureate and High School of Business

We're pleased to share that students at Oconomowoc High (WI) are taking High School of Business courses as the career component of the International Baccalaureate Career Programme. Students complete two Diploma Programme subjects and four career-related courses (HSB) as part of the requirements. See the details in this handout

Now Accepting High School of Business Applications

MBA Research is now accepting applications for new High School of Business™ sites for the 2019/20 school year. Application deadline is December 1st. 

Where to find information:

  • Getting Started: Steps to learn about and apply to become a High School of Business™ site
  • Program Benefits: Core program components and benefits to students, school, and community
  • College Credits: National and local agreements

 

Iowa Dept of Ed Hosts High School of Business Open House

Iowa Educators recently visited Waverly-Shell Rock High's High School of Business program. WSR High worked in conjunction with the Iowa Department of Education to build working on projects, managing all aspects of a coffee shop, and learned how students are earning college credits. Photos, details, and an explanation of why the Iowa Dept of Ed is helping schools learn about the program are in this article published by the Iowa Department of Education.

Economic Projects Featured on TV

Students at Grand Junction High School in Colorado proved once again that High School of Business™ is in-depth, real-world learning. GJHS High School of Business™ students were featured on their local news station KKCO 11 for presenting economic analyses to a group of commercial realtors, economic experts, and property owners about what can be done to a nearby vacant lot. To prepare for their presentations, students made cold calls to the city manager and mayor, and had the opportunity to interview them both. Excellent job to these students, and thank you to HSB teacher Cindy Ficklin for sharing!

Students Talk Investments at Marquette University

Wisconsin high school students got an inside look recently at Marquette University's Applied Investment Program. The college students, who manage real cash in the course, talked about the process of researching investments and how to pitch proposals. This experience was a perfect complement to the High School of Business™ curriculum used by West Bend East/West High. Teacher Allison Holzer's students in the Principles of Finance class will learn techniques for building profitable portfolios using modern methods such as BetterInvesting's Stock Selection Guide.

Engage Students from Day 1 of Class


Sophomore at Eastern High in Louisville, KY, sell snacks as a dynamic
start to their HSB Business Economics course.

Students in Rachel Frydlewicz's High School of Business class start their Business Economics course by planning a snack sale on Day 1 and executing it on Day 2. This quick activity accomplishes many goals for teachers. It gives students a taste of business experience that Frydlewicz can refer back to all semester as students learn about supply and demand, pricing, incentives, profit margin, etc. It also proves her High School of Business course isn't going to be a "traditional" class. There are seven hands-on, in-depth projects to look forward to. Next time you start a course, try an activity like this to build excitement for what lies ahead.

Students Experience Design and Production Processes Up-close

Holyoke High School’s High School of Business™ classes recently had an opportunity to travel to Loveland, CO and Boulder, CO to tour LulzBot and Celestial Seasonings production plants. 

LulzBot is a 3D printer manufacturer located in Loveland and founded in 2011. LulzBot serves tens of thousands of people in 85 different countries, selling their award-winning printers. Recently, they were also named the Fastest-Growing Privately Held Computer Hardware Company in the U.S., ranked no. 122 in Inc. Magazine’s list of fastest-growing privately held companies, and achieved 2,782 percent three-year sales growth which led all computer hardware companies. 

Students also toured the production facility of the tea manufacturer Celestial Seasonings. Celestial Seasonings began in 1969 by a young group of entrepreneurs, harvesting wild herbs from the Rocky Mountains.  At present, the ingredients are sourced from over 35 different countries, and production amounts to over 1 million bags of tea per day in their Boulder factory.

The students were able to see first-hand how the products that they purchase daily, are built and packaged.  They were even able to see the engineers go through their actual design process on white-boards and the research and development teams trying new ways to get desired results!  They saw production lines, robotics, and even a 3D printer printing a 3D printer!  It was a great learning experience for all and an amazing day!

Thank you to Holyoke Business Teacher, Lori Nelson, for sharing her students’ experiences with us.



HSB Teacher Completers Announced

Congratulations to the High School of Business™ teachers who’ve completed the full training sequence this year. These teachers have completed a minimum of six required course trainings in business, economics, marketing, finance, management, and business strategies (84 hours). Some have additionally completed two optional courses in leadership and/or wealth management* (7-14 hours).

We know traveling and attending training twice a year over the course of 3+ years while also teaching your courses and maintaining your classroom activities is no small feat. Thank you for your commitment to your students and to your professional development. We are grateful to have you in the program!

 

Fall 2018 Completers: (pictured above)
Ken Burrow, Waverly-Shell Rock High School, IA
Noelle Castorena*, Academy of Arts, Careers and Technology, NV
Keith Clayton*, Odyssey Early College and Career Options, CO
Traci Davenport*, Peetz High School/NE BOCES, CO
Scott Giraud, Waverly-Shell Rock High School, IA
Hope Johnson Gordon, Withrow University High School, OH
Lori Nelson*, Holyoke High School/NE BOCES, CO
Andy Schafer, Columbus Grove High School, OH
Jackie Wentworth*, Wray High School/NE BOCES, CO

Summer 2018 Completers:
Thomas Anders*, Green Valley High School, (NV)
Floyda Blanchard, Jones Leadership Academy, (OH)
Tamara Farsi*, Legacy High School, (NV)
Fielding Hambright*, Academy of Arts, Careers, and Technology, (NV
Krista Heverly, Austintown Fitch High School, (OH)
Christine Kinnick, Austintown Fitch High School, (OH)
Kim McCoy, Legacy High School, (NV
Christina Reisinger, E.L. Bowsher High School, (OH)
Matthew Schneiderman*, Caldwell High School, (ID)
Jana Shuey, Plattsmouth High School, (NE)
Kristen Stuart*, West Career & Technical Academy, (NV)
Dee Winegar*, Caldwell High School, (ID)


Top Scoring Students Recognized for 2017-2018

During our recent Fall Training Institute in Kansas City, Missouri, HSB Director, Lisa Berkey, announced the top scoring students at schools across the country. In prior years we’ve spoken with teachers and administrators at schools where students are achieving high scores. Below we share a few key findings that these schools have in place.

Experience: Most of these schools have been participating in the HSB program for several years. We know as teachers gain experience teaching the courses, they see the results reflected in their students’ learning outcomes.

Collaboration and professional development: Many of these schools work together as a team in some way to gain insight from one another. In Colorado they have statewide HSB professional development twice per school year. In the Great Oaks system in Cincinnati they have six schools participating that have dedicated HSB professional development days. And schools in Nevada, particularly Clark County schools, work together and welcome collaboration with other NV districts.

Test preparation: Several of the high scoring schools reported that they weave test preparation throughout their courses.  We asked teachers to document how they do this. Their ideas are now posted on the ‘Online Exams’ page of the HSB Teacher’s Wiki.

You can view the schools with high-scoring students by clicking on the individual course links below. Because of tied scores, you’ll find there are more than 20 students in the “top 20”.  In the chart below we’ve listed the highest scores, the average high scores, and the national averages, by course. Congratulations to your teachers, students, and steering team members. Thank you for all that you do to continuously improve the program at your school!

Key Takeaways From Annual HSB Survey

Every HSB school completes a thorough, annual evaluation of its program. MBA Research reviews the results in aggregate to measure the impact of the program, identify areas for improvement, and share best practices. Below are some of the key takeaways from our HSB sites.

Key Data Points:

  • 9.5: Average number of college credits HSB students have the opportunity to earn at a participating school.
  • 46% of participating schools have local agreements with 2-year colleges.
  • 29% of participating schools have local agreements with 4-year universities.
  • 6 national credit agreements are available to all HSB completers.
  • 26% of schools recognize HSB courses with honors or weighted grading.
  • 100% of HSB completers met their state's requirements for ELA and Math.
  • 93.5% of HSB completers met their state's requirements in technical skills.

Entrepreneurship goes deeper in High School of Business

In response to the growing importance of entrepreneurial skills, we’ve made improvements to the High School of Business (HSB) senior-year courses. Students now have more time to operate their own class business and therefore go deeper into entrepreneurship content via hands-on learning. The change also means more college credit opportunities for HSB students since the first semester course, Principles of Management, is now more closely aligned with similar post-secondary courses. At present, students who complete the HSB program earn an average of 9 college credits via local and national credit agreements. 

During second semester, HSB seniors open a class business and run it for a full 7 weeks. The first-semester course incorporates planning for the business, allowing students to get off to a fast start second semester as they actualize their business. 

MBA Research updates all High School of Business course guides each year to ensure fresh, engaging content. Changes are identified via research with business & industry and educators.

Congrats to HSB Teacher Completers

Congratulations to all of the High School of Business teachers who completed the full training sequence this summer. All of these teachers have completed a minimum of six course trainings over the span of three years in business, economics, marketing, finance, management, and business strategies. Some have additionally completed two optional courses in leadership and wealth management*.

*Thomas Anders, Green Valley High School, Henderson, Nevada
Floyda Blanchard, Jones Leadership Academy, Toledo, Ohio
*Tamara Farsi, Legacy High School, North Las Vegas, Nevada
*Fielding Hambright, Academy of Arts, Careers, and Technology, Reno, Nevada
Krista Heverly, Austintown Fitch High School, Austintown, Ohio
Christine Kinnick, Austintown Fitch High School, Austintown, Ohio
Kim McCoy, Legacy High School, North Las Vegas, Nevada
Christina Reisinger, E.L. Bowsher High School, Toledo, Ohio
*Matthew Schneiderman, Caldwell High School, Caldwell, Idaho
Jana Shuey, Plattsmouth High School, Plattsmouth, Nebraska
*Kristen Stuart, West Career & Technical Academy, Las Vegas, Nevada
*Dee Winegar, Caldwell High School, Caldwell, Idaho

Ohio School Connects High School of Business and Junior Achievement

New ventures need capital. Students at GlenOak High found a source for funds by pairing Junior Achievement with the senior-year High School of Business entrepreneurship project. The JA Company Program assists students in getting funding for their businesses.

Businesses opened by the students include a cell accessories retailer targeting both b-to-c and b-to-b customers; a company that repurposes cabinet doors to create unique serving trays and signs; and an artisanal business of decorative lighted glass bottles. Each company generated between $1300 and $3100 in sales. In addition, students who created the cell accessories business placed in JA's competition and received a cash prize.

Kudos to GlenOak Teacher Amanda deFays for aligning the programs to create a powerful combination of student learning!

Congratulations Longmont HSB on Winning JA Stock Market Challenge

“The winning LHS (CO) team grew their investment over 90% to $952,000 landing them in 1st place out of 42 teams!” Read the full article here.

Columbus Grove HSB Students Prove Adept at Business Development

The High School of Business™ students at Columbus Grove tackled challenging development ideas for downtown Lima, Ohio. The Grove High School students "toured six properties that are currently the focus of redevelopment efforts in the city", and presented their ideas to the Allen Economic Development Group. Read more here.

Disney Program Enriches Business Courses

In the Disney Youth Education Series, "Disney's Approach to Leadership & Teamwork," Nevada-based students practiced overcoming obstacles by working as a team and thinking creatively to develop solutions. Teacher Tom Anders said they "also learned  Walt Disney's leadership strategies and how to apply them to achieve stronger collaboration skills, increase confidence, and set a course for success. All of these skills are vital to the High School of Business™ program because of its project-based team learning style." 

Colorado Students Fuel Their High School of Business™ Program

The Mountain Range (CO) High School of Business™ students have partnered with their local Circle K gas station to help fuel their HSB program. Circle K has designated one pump to the Mountain Range HSB students. On designated days, the pump earns the program $.10 per gallon of gas. In January, the students were presented with a $1000.00 check from their first semester pump proceeds! These funds can go toward any number of initiatives, including student organization competition travel, field trips to connect with more local business, or a future visit to the NYC Stock Exchange! Congratulations to Mountain Range HSB students on making important business connections in their community!

Mountain Range High School of Business Students - Pies for Pediatric Hospice

The Mountain Range High School of Business™ students partnered with local businesses and raised $15,247.01 for children receiving pediatric hospice care from The Butterfly Program. 

The Butterfly Program, originally founded by Children’s Hospital Colorado and Porter Hospice of Centura Health at Home, has filled a unique and relatively empty niche in the Denver metropolitan community since 1999. The program serves medically underserved, low-income families who are coping with the impending death of a child. These children have been diagnosed with an illness and have less than six to twelve months to live. The program offers pediatric palliative and comfort care either at home or in the hospital.

A team of business students from the Mountain Range High School of Business program challenged staff members to raise donations for The Butterfly Program​​​​. ​Students who raised more money than the staff members "pied" the staff member at a school assembly.  The HSB students will be honored at the annual Butterfly Program corporate donation event "Soup for the Soul" on February 22, 2018.  

High School of Business Programs in Idaho Gain Local and National Press

Kudos to Idaho's High School of Business™ students and sites! They gained national publicity recently when an article written by the Idaho Press-Tribune was featured in an ASCD enewsletter. Project-based learning, college credit, work-based learning, and high expectations are leading to great outcomes. The article explains the HSB program, including local customizations (a trip to the New York Stock Exchange!)

Interview with HSB Alum, Joseph Kline

“High School of Business set me apart on applications and interviews.”
When he applied to colleges, Joseph Kline, like many good students, had the grades and the scores to get into top-tier institutions. But he could also talk intelligently about the business concepts and experiences. That combination set him apart from his peers and earned him a spot in The Ohio State University’s Fisher College of Business Honors Program.

“The concepts we learned in class were immediately applicable.”
High School of Business combines real projects, an internship, and a student-run business with accelerated learning standards. This gives students the opportunity to see and experience business. By the time he arrived at OSU, he’d already solved problems in his high school’s student-run business and conversed with business executives during his internship.

Ready to excel in college.
Once classes started at OSU, the project management, teamwork, and presentation skills he’d used in every High School of Business course were quickly put to use. All HSB courses utilize project-based learning. Projects end with a presentation to an authentic audience—that’s approximately 30 presentations. “There is no fear of public speaking when they leave this program,” said Jodi Adams, Kline’s former HSB teacher at Eastern High School in Louisville, Kentucky. “English teachers tell me that when they’re having students do presentations, they know who the HSB students are.”

A bright future beyond.
Kline’s long-term career aspiration is to be a professor of economics. Before embarking on his Ph.D., he plans to serve for a year in Americorps.